Stash cat, my assistant-in-training.

Stash cat, my assistant-in-training.

I am officially in the throes of organizing an estate sale. Well, two, actually. And that means that, as predicted, my quilting time is taking a bit of a hit.

**However, I did manage to pump out two hexagon flowers while watching March Madness last night. I’ve got Louisville taking the whole thing.

 

Yes, those are NCAA March Madness brackets. I have three boys and a husband who live, eat, and breath basketball. I live in a locker room...

Yes, those are NCAA March Madness brackets. I have three boys and a husband who live, eat, and breath basketball. I live in a locker room…

But back to quilting. One of my sales has quite the collection of vintage quilts dating back to the 1920’s. Some of the quilts were made by my client, Geri, who is a lovely lady in her late 80’s; it is her estate that I am organizing. Others were made by her mom when Geri was young.

So, for Anything Goes Monday, I will be working on displaying and marketing these historic quilts. That means photographing them for my estate sale website, The Great Estate.

Soooo, wanna see the quilts??

I knew you did.

First up is this gem made by Geri’s mom:

Circa 1920's Dresden Plate.

Circa 1920’s Dresden Plate.

Such a great vintage quilt, right?

Up close and personal.

Up close and personal.

Closer still.

Closer still.

This quilt was, of course, hand pieced. And, because back then, quilts were made to be used and loved…

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…this one has some gently ‘loved’ spots.

I hope all my quilts look like this some day.

I hope all my quilts look like this some day.

The quilting pattern on the back.

The quilting pattern on the back.

Next is this great quilt.

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This one was done by Geri and it was pieced on a very cool 1960’s White (which is a fabulous, retro aqua color) sewing machine. Still sews like a dream.

Circa 1960's.

This quilt is much lighter than the other quilts. I will be asking Geri today exactly when she made it. The back feels like homespun.

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Going back in time to this baby.

Love the blue.

Love the blue.

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Geri's mom favored quilting in a fan pattern.

Geri’s mom favored quilting in a fan pattern.

Again, this quilt was also well-worn with love.

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These quilts are such a great foray into the basic blocks that most of us learned when we were just starting our quilting journeys.

Case in point:

C'mon, who hasn't made this block a couple dozen times?

C’mon, who hasn’t made this block a couple dozen times?

This is another one made by Geri’s mom. I love, love, love the fabrics. Which got me to thinking and remembering that, in many of the very old vintage quilts, the fabrics weren’t meticulously picked out at a quilt store and carefully coordinated. These fabrics were, often times, pieces of other linens or clothing that they put to practical second use.

Sometimes art springs from function, necessity, and plain old ingenuity. Which makes me wonder if, at times, we (I) make the process more complicated and costly than it really needs to be. Just musing….

A closer look at some of the fabrics in this quilt:

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And the simple hand-quilting pattern as seen on the back. I love how puffy it is.

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This next quilt is really amazing.

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Just in time for the Fourth of July. This is a great quilt that deserves another full-scale view.

Told you so.

Impressive.

Hand-pieced glory.

Hand-pieced glory.

And hand-quilted. Oh my!

And hand-quilted. Oh my!

One thing that I have seen quite often in vintage quilts is the use of this in-your-face pink.

Pink on purpose.

Pink on purpose.

I have to admit, I’m not a fan of this pink. My own grandmother and great grandmother used this pink in their quilts as well. But, pink or not, this quilt is still a great look at another tried and true block: the bear paw.

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And, yes, this quilt is old.

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When I finished photographing all the quilts for the sale I got to fold them. Yes, I said, I “got to fold them”, like it’s a privilege or something…because it is.

Admit it. You know what I’m talking about.

Stack of love.

Stack of folded love.

Before I go, I’d like to finish with the last quilt top made several years ago by my dear client, Geri.

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Geri couldn’t finish this quilt because macular degeneration has left her with only minimal peripheral vision. But even with failing sight, she cut the squares and sewed the seams of this quilt with an accuracy I can only hope to achieve one day.

I call that brave.

I call that determined.

I call that love.

 

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